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Cottage Port Isaac Cornwall

 

Jacobs Cottage:

Port Isaac is a highly desirable fishing village with scenic harbour and coastline on the north Cornish coast

 

Jacob's Cottage has been totally refurbished in the last 2 years retaining its wonderful character with beams and original cast iron fire places. It sits in the lower part of the village close to the harbour.

 

Port Isaac Cornwall

 

Port Isaac has a long history of fishing and to this day there are still fishermen working from the Platt, where the fishermen land their daily catch of fish, crab and lobster and various other delicacies.

 

You can sit here and drift into days gone by so easily.

 

Port Isaac makes the perfect location for holidays both in and out of season. It is well suited for a whole variety of outdoor activities or, for the less energetic, just soaking up the atmosphere and enjoying the delights of the local restaurants and pubs.

 

 

 

 

 

Jacobs Cottage Consists of:

 

Downstairs is a lovely 21" kitchen dining area with French range and Belfast sink.
On the first floor is a quaint sittingroom with single bedroom and shower room.

 

On the second floor is a double bedroom and bunk bed room with single bed also. The cottage has mod cons including washing machine, microwave, tv, video and dvd player plus a cd music system.


Jacob's Cottage is a NON-SMOKING cottage.
At the owners discretion well behaved pets are welcome.

 

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Polzeath Beach

Beaches & Surfing (Surf capital of the UK)

 

Near Port Isaac there are some excellent sandy beaches for swimming and surfing. Cornwall's location, jutting straight out into the Atlantic Ocean, makes it a magnet for swell. Combine this with its milder climate and a plethora of excellent beaches and you have the UK's premier surf destination. Until very recently Cornwall was basically unchallenged by anywhere in the British Isles for the quality of surfers it has produced over the years. This is gradually changing as spots in the North East, Northern Ireland, South Wales and Scotland gain in reputation, but it is hard to imagine any of these places have the unique combination that makes Cornwall the surf capital of the UK.

 

Polzeath beach is a fantastic surfing beach with the added benefit of being absolutely stunning! It is a very durable beach offering a variety of waves, on various peaks, across the whole tidal range and in most swells. It is located between two low headlands giving the beach a long narrow shape. This creates shifting peaks that produce lefts and rights in the middle of the beach along with a right hand point break off Pentire Point when the swell is big and channelled up into the side of the bay. At Rock there is sailing and waterskiing on the Camel Estuary. The beautiful beaches of Trebarwith Strand and Daymer Bay are also not far away.


Restaurants in Port Isaac

 

The Harbour


The Harbour is my favorite and is run by chef Emily, who trained with Prue Leith and at the Tante Marie cookery school.

 

Emily worked for three years in the restaurant industry in Burgundy and brings French and Continental influences to the dishes she creates, while her love of the fantastic Cornish ingredients available locally inspires the menu. The Harbour has a wide variety of just-caught seafood, from lobster and crab to mackerel and sea bass.

 

The restaurant has the feel of a cosy French bistro, with a fresh, seasonal menu based on excellent local produce and a carefully sourced wine list featuring great vintages from smaller vineyards at very affordable prices. Add the friendly, cosy atmosphere and the informal feel, and you'll see why people return to The Harbour again and again.

 

 

 

Other Restaurants include:

 

The Slipway, The Moat.

 

Port Isaac also has a pub and a wide selection of local galleries, arts and crafts. Visit the excellent pottery, which is open all year, and see the original artwork by Katie Childs at her Cliffside Gallery.


Spend a balmy evening on the Platt listening to the weekly concert (in season) by the St. Breward Silver Band or the ever popular "Fishermans Friends (watch video)", shanty singers.

Whole days can be whiled away, crabbing in the rock pools left behind on Port Isaac beach at low tide, children love it, (adults too!)

 

 

 

 

 

Location map:

 

 

View map of PL29 3RB on Multimap.com
Get directions to or from PL29 3RB

 

 

Attractions:

 

Camel Trail

A seventeen mile long cycle path which follows the River Camel from Padstow, on the north Cornish coast, to the edge of Bodmin Moor.

 

Tintagel Castle

Clifftop ruins of the castle which was allegedly the fortress used by King Arthur.

 

The Eden Project

The Eden Project is an experience in a breathtaking location; a global garden; a place of beauty and wonder. The world famous architecture and art draws inspiration from nature, the educational work is about creating a positive future in a world that is going to go through radical change, and they try to ensure everyone who visits Eden leaves knowing something more about their connection to the world. That's the big stuff…Eden is also about simple pleasures; enjoying tasty food, rediscovering what puts the great into the great outdoors, imaginative play for children, taking time to stop and smell the flowers, having a good time.

 

Bodmin Jail

Bodmin Jail, which was built as the County Prison in 1778 and was notorious for its cramped conditions and public hangings, is now a fascinating museum.

 

The Lost Garden of Heligan
They comprise eighty acres of pleasure grounds plus a complex of walled gardens and a huge vegetable garden. The house, built by William Tremayne in 1603, was the seat of the Tremayne family who controlled over 1000 acres in the area from Pentewan to Gorran. This Estate was totally self sufficient, having a number of quarries, woods, farms, a brickworks (the earliest in Cornwall in 1681), a flour mill, a sawmill, a brewery, and productive orchards and gardens. It is the gardens that are now claimed to be the site of the largest garden restoration in Europe. Heligan House (meaning "the willows" in Cornish ), was the Tremayne's seat, but is not part of the gardens project.